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Yogurt, paper, fuel winners at annual made-from-soy contest
March 24, 2016 - News Release

A soy-based drinkable yogurt, specialty rolling papers made from soy fibre and an alternative soy-based fuel source are among the winners in this year’s Project SOY (Soybean Opportunities for Youth) competition.

The 20th annual event, held March 18, showcased 13 projects created by University of Guelph students from the Guelph and Ridgetown campuses.

“Project SOY does a superb job of showcasing the ingenuity and enthusiasm of U of G students,” said Malcolm Campbell, vice-president (research), who emceed the event.
“It also highlights the passion shared by our community leaders for the work done at U of G and its impact in Canada and beyond.”

Reflecting on the event’s anniversary, Peter Hannam, a soybean industry pioneer who helped found Project SOY, said:

“We thought after a few years and 20 or so projects, people might run out of ideas. But they never did, and look at where we are today.”

Project SOY cash prizes were awarded for diploma, undergraduate and graduate projects.

Topping the undergraduate category was YoSOYummy, a soy-based drinkable yogurt with extra isoflavones developed by Christine Chung, Aly Kotwa, Christine Pelchat and Emma Thompson.

Second place went to Olivia Giacobbi, Richard Park and Joelle Wong for Soy Pearls, soy alternatives for tapioca used in bubble tea. SoyaSeal, a biodegradable soy protein lining for paper cups created by Geoffrey Beamish, Michael Biancaniello and Joyce Cheng, won third place.

Honourable mentions in the undergraduate category went to Jordan MacKenzie, Gabriel Allegrini and Alyssa Green for Soybe frozen yogurt, and Ariella Sone and Jenny Dicker for Soy Pods, a soybean-based hot beverage.

Graduate student Bharat Regmi won first prize for Torrefied Pellets, a soy-based fuel source. Eamonn McGuinty came second with a home gardening tool made of soybeans and recycled plastic.

In the diploma category, first place went to Greg Rooney, Ian Seifried and Matthew Baute of Ridgetown Campus for their SoyPure specialty rolling papers made from soy fibre. Second place went to Jessica LeClair of Ridgetown Campus for Soy Naturalle cosmetics for oily skin.

U of G president Franco Vaccarino, MPP Liz Sandals and MP Lloyd Longfield discussed projects with the participants.

Project SOY is sponsored by DEKALB Brand Seeds, SOY 20/20, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Grain Farmers of Ontario, and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.


Project SOY 2015 Winners Named
March 23, 2015 - News Release

A high-tech epoxy, an industrial seed coating and hair products -– all containing soy — are among the winners in this year’s Project SOY (Soybean Opportunities for Youth) competition.

The 19th annual event held last week in Guelph showcased eight projects from a total of 18 University of Guelph students from the main campus and Alfred and Ridgetown campuses.

Project SOY cash prizes are awarded for diploma, undergraduate and graduate projects. First place in each category wins $2,500, second place receives $1,000 and third place is awarded $500.

In the diploma category, first place was won by Isabelle Groulx for Nutrichoc’O soy.

Topping the undergraduate category was Sojabond, an epoxy for high-tech applications designed by Michael Biancaniello, Kyle Bradfield, Shujath Khan and Aalaa Osman.

In the graduate category, Oscar Valerio and Rajendran Muthuraj won first prize for Soybag, a soy-based shopping bag.

Other entries this year included fire logs, hair products and a soy-based seed coating.

Project SOY is sponsored by DEKALB Brand Seeds, SOY20/20, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Grain Farmers of Ontario, and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

Contact:
Owen Roberts, Director, Research Communications, 519 824-4120, Ext. 58278, owen@uoguelph.ca
Bethany Atkinson, student coordinator, 519 824-4120, Ext. 52667, soybeans@uoguelph.ca



Guelph students investigate creative uses for Ontario’s biggest crop
November 25, 2013

Personal lubricants, environmentally friendly packaging and renewable energy all have something in common: soybeans.

Twenty diverse product proposals have been received for the 2013-14 Project SOY competition. Students registered in four graduate teams, 10 undergraduate teams and six diploma category teams will explore the market opportunities and overcome development obstacles to create innovative products with soy.

Teams exhibiting the best combination of determination, ingenuity, presentation skills and comprehensive marketing plans will be in the running for the $2,500 first place prize in each category.

“I was intrigued by the proposals from registrants demonstrating ‘thinking outside of the box’ and I’m really excited to see their concepts develop as they prepare to present the products to industry,” stated Laura Nanne – this year’s Project SOY student coordinator.

Their efforts will culminate in a written report and presentation at the Project SOY finale next March when participants showcase their product to judges, industry members and the public. One judge from each of the competition sponsors – DEKALB, Soy 20/20, OMAF MRA, and Grain Farmers of Ontario – will challenge participants to consider the real world tangibility, sustainability and marketability of their products.

“Until then, Project SOY participants will be busy leveraging the expertise of University of Guelph faculty and advisors alongside their skills, interests and consumer intuition,” says Nanne.

Soybeans, planted on more acres of Ontario farmland than any other field crop, have unique properties that lend themselves to a broad array of uses. Protein constitutes up to 48 per cent of the oilseed’s composition. It is also high in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. And finally, the plant can provide much of its own nitrogen required for growth and development.


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